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Preventing water crises
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Preventing water crises

A captivating record about the rivers of Amazonia

A special album by the American composer Philip Glass and Brazilian band Uakti takes us on a journey to the riversides of the Amazonian Basin. The album entitled Aguas da Amazonia, published in 1999, invokes both the playful and the spellbinding aspect of water with a blend of classical, new age and jazz music.

Collaboration between the American composer Philip Glass and Uakti, a Brazilian band known for their special, home-made instruments began in 1993 and eventually led to the publication of the Aguas da Amazonia album.

Glass is one of the most influential figures in contemporary music. He has composed a number of operas and musicals, but he has written orchestral pieces, symphonies, concertos and solo pieces as well. He has composed music for more than a dozen films, three of which (Kundun, The Hours and Notes on a Scandal) were nominated for Oscar awards.

The Brazilian band Uakti was founded in 1978 under the leadership of Marco Antônio Guimarães. They borrowed their name from a mythological creature that lived along the banks of the Rio Negro, and whose body was full of holes that made special sounds when the wind blew through them, which bewitched the women of nearby tribes. The men, offended, hunted and killed the creature. Palm trees grew on his grave, and the music from the flutes made from those palm trees also had an enchanting effect.

The artists dedicated the pieces on the album to the Amazon and its tributaries, along with the world’s second longest river, the Amazon, while individual songs were dedicated to the Tiquiê, the Japurá, the Purus, the Negro, the Madeira, the Tapajós, the Paru and the Xingu rivers.

Further information: philipglass.com

The Hungarian Post greets the Budapest Water Summit 2019 with stamp-release

The unique stamp issued on the occasion of the Budapest Water Summit 2019, have been released by Mr János Áder, President of Hungary and Mr György Schamschula, CEO of Magyar Posta Zrt. (Hungarian Post) on Monday, October 7th, at the Sándor Palace in Budapest.

Underwater dance to protect the oceans

It is no accident that Christine Ren decided to call herself The Underwater Woman: she combines her passion for dancing with ocean conservation, so she poses her dance moves under the surface for breathtaking photos such as the pieces in the series Protect What’s Precious, which protests trawling.

Spectacular works of art made of thousands of sea shells

British multimedia artist Rowan Mersh finds inspiration in nature. He uses thousands of shells to create his mesmerizing contemporary sculptures. His experimental approach inspires him to turn everyday objects into works of art, with particular attention to the harmony of shape, colour and geometry.

The calm beauty of the infinite ocean in paintings

The ethereal paintings of Bree Brooks celebrate the calm, peaceful aspect, the unearthly beauty of the ocean. The canvas paintings show large bodies of water from a bird’s eye perspective, interrupted by the coastline or boats swaying in the ocean.

The world through the eyes of a sea captain

Zay Yar Lin, a sea captain from Myanmar, doesn’t only capture the everyday life of seafarers – their struggle with the seas and the excitement of reaching shore – but also fishermen, sailors and the busy world of harbours, as well. In his photos, he places the emphasis on lighting, composition, the interplay of colours and unusual perspectives. His shots are abstract, still they also communicate stories about everyday people.

Water magic hidden in rings

The spellbinding rings produced by a Vancouver-based studio, Secret Wood, showcase Canada’s natural wonders. In addition to the country’s rugged mountains, luxurious emerald forests and wonderful northern lights, the design studio has also been inspired by majestic waterfalls.

An ice cavern under a melting glacier

The Aletsch Glacier, whose source is at an elevation over 4000 metres in the Bernese Alps, is Europe’s longest and largest volume glacier, which is visible from space. At present, its area covered with ice all year is 28.6 square kilometres, but it is getting smaller.

On the trail of turquoise ice

In her series entitled Blue Ice, photographer Julieanna Kost has captured the strikingly beautiful blue and turquoise colours and gradations of the glaciers and icebergs of Antarctica. She embarked on her Antarctic expedition on a small motor boat to record the ice landscapes using digital technology.

Amazing photos of the magical ice formations of Alaska

Japanese photographer Ryota Kajita has captured the icy beauty of Alaskan landscapes in his series Ice Formations. The artist, now living in Alaska, has spent seven years exploring the remote and uninhabited regions of the state so as to capture the complex natural patterns.

The symbiosis of humans and water – through the eyes of architects

Water is a fundamental condition of life – it is irreplaceable and indispensable, it is very literally the wellspring of life, and humans and water have been living in a close symbiosis since time immemorial. Contemporary architects are also happy to reflect on that relationship.

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