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Preventing water crises
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Preventing water crises

Seventeen countries suffer critical water shortages

According to a report from the World Resources Institute, 17 countries are facing extremely high water stress, from India through Israel to Botswana. Many of the countries in question – which, collectively, are home to a quarter of the world’s population – are in the Middle East and North Africa.

Recently, a number of metropolises have had to face water shortages, such as Sao Paulo, India’s sixth largest city Chennai and Cape Town.

In some places, the catastrophe, which makes everyday life almost impossible for residents and also causes massive economic damage, was caused by extreme drought, in others by inappropriate water management, or even a combination of both factors.

Scientists at the World Resources Institute classify the world’s countries into five categories of water stress. Today, 17 countries are in the extremely high baseline water stress category, and 27 countries have high baseline water stress.

In the table from the World Resources Institute report, countries with extremely high water stress are marked
dark red, those with high water stress are marked red, while orange indicates medium–high, and yellow
indicates low–medium baseline water stress
Table: wri.org
Further information: WRI

UN report: climate change could cause global famine

According to a new report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that focuses on the interaction between climate change, desertification and food security, if present land use habits are maintained, the planet’s capacity to produce food will drop drastically.

European Union aid for drought-stricken Africa

The EU is contributing a further 50 million euro to alleviate drought damage in a number of Eastern and Central African countries. According to estimates, more than 4 million children and about 3 million pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers are undernourished in the region.

Zimbabwe hit by power outages due to drought

Drought in the South African country that largely relies on hydroelectric power is causing not only shortages of drinking water but also power outages of up to 16 hours a day in the capital.

The endangered Nile

The water yield of the River Nile is becoming increasingly erratic as a result of climate change, which may have very grave consequences for Egypt.

India among the countries worst affected by global warming

Unprecedented droughts, heat waves claiming more than a hundred lives: the summer of 2019 has made it clear for the whole world that India is in big trouble. How will climate change shape the future of the country?

Are Europe's rivers also at the risk of running dry?

Climate change is increasingly making itself felt in Europe, too: flash floods, heat waves, droughts and forest fires are on the rise on the continent.

Water shortages: Spain and Morocco to follow India?

Water shortages represent one of the most severe consequences of global warming, impacting growing numbers of people. In 2018, the Cape Town water crisis made global news. This year so far, the situation is the worst in India: millions are struggling to get water day after day.

Eastern Germany at the risk of water shortages

Drought had already reduced the water yield of many natural waters in Germany drastically last year, but this year, due to the record heat wave sweeping across Europe, experts are warning about the possibility of actual water shortages in some areas.

The poor must fight for every drop of water in India

The Indian water shortage resulting from unprecedented drought intensifies already significant social inequality.

The UN is worried about climate apartheid

Philip Alston, a UN expert on human rights claims that the world will soon face the risk of climate apartheid, as we are progressing towards a future in which only the rich will have the opportunity to escape the negative consequences of global warming while the poor suffer from the heat and famines.

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