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Preventing water crises
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Preventing water crises

Water and Jobs

At the global level, three of every four jobs are related to water in some way. The 2016 World Water Development Report examines the links between water and jobs, employment and economic development. The key findings of the report are summarised below.

Without water, there are no jobs

The most water-intensive sectors are agriculture, fishing and forestry, and they alone provide employment for 1 billion people. Water scarcity and increasingly difficult access to water resources eliminate water-intensive professions and they may hinder economic growth in the coming years. Efforts must be made in order to ensure that the regions impacted are able to adapt to increasing water scarcity, thereby preventing a crisis in local employment and its consequences associated with trade and migration.

Improved water quality means better jobs, a better labour force, and a higher standard of life

Access to suitable drinking water and domestic, school and workplace infrastructure for the separate treatment of human waste result in more efficient employees in the labour market in better health condition, with generally higher qualifications. Non-sustainable water management jeopardises the hard-earned successes in eliminating poverty and creating jobs. Greater emphasis must be placed on understanding that water resources, the water infrastructure and associated services have a comprehensive role in economic growth and job creation, and that sustainable planning must take those aspects into account.

Water scarcity and increasingly difficult access to water resources eliminate water-intensive professions Photo: Shutterstock

Investment in water creates jobs

Investment in water infrastructure can be implemented exceptionally cost-efficiently, while they also have a positive impact on many sectors of the economy. Investment creating jobs in water resource management, water supply and public sanitation services have a high return on investment and an additional significant multiplicative effect on job creation in other sectors. Long-term planning and efficient financing are indispensable in sophisticated water management in order to actually achieve the benefits in job creation, economic growth and other, associated social and economic areas.

The relationship between water and jobs in our changing world

Climate change is exacerbating the problem of access to water, and unavoidably eliminates some jobs. The transition to a greener economy and the development of environment-friendly technologies has a beneficial effect on employment and on the creation of ethical jobs. Innovative learning methods and relevant professional and scientific education are exceptionally important for reinforcing the system of institutions and in developing jobs in all sectors associated with water.

The transition to a greener economy has a beneficial effect on employment Photo: Shutterstock

The World Water Development Report is available on the UNESCO website.

Further information: UNESCO

Hungarian developments may solve the problem of pharmaceutical residues worldwide

The filtering of pharmaceutical derivatives from water is a problem for almost the entire world. That was part of the reason for the international interest elicited at the Budapest Water Summit by the results of a National Competitiveness and Excellence Programme (NVKP) project led by the Geographical Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Science’s Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, which cover the complete set of associated problems.

New Coca-Cola bottles made of recycled marine waste

Coca-Cola has presented its first bottle made by recycling marine waste. At its test facility, it has so far produced 300 bottles that contain 25% plastic waste fished out the Mediterranean Sea.

The main reforms and innovations that highly promote water security and sustainable development

Interview with Mr. Xavier Leflaive, Principal Administrator, Environment Directorate, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

How recent political conflicts can be the consequences of insufficient water resources

Interview with Professor Aaron Wolf, Director of the Program in Water Conflict Management, Oregon State University (USA).

Budapest Water Summit attracts tremendous interest

A great many people were interested in the Budapest Water Summit – the importance of the event is attested by the fact that over 2,300 people from 118 countries had applied to attend the event, and along with the over 30 ministerial delegations, leaders of international organisations and multilateral financing institutions, as well as water industry experts have also attended.

BWS Bulletin – Daily report of the Budapest Water Summit 2019 – The third day

The Institute for Sustainable Development have summarized the third day of the Budapest Water Summit 2019 as part of the so-called BWS Bulletin.

János Áder: Young people would like to preserve Hungary as their grandparents saw it

Young people wish to live in a clean environment, that natural need is the message of the drawings, photos and posters they submitted to the competition, said President János Áder to journalists after the awards ceremony of the SDG for Kids competition at the Budapest Water Summit.

Papal message to the participants of the Budapest Water Summit 2019

BWS Bulletin – Daily report of the Budapest Water Summit 2019 – The second day

The Institute for Sustainable Development have summarized the second day of the Budapest Water Summit 2019 as part of the BWS Bulletin

BWS Bulletin – Daily report of the Budapest Water Summit 2019 – The first day

The Institute for Sustainable Development have summarized the first day of the Budapest Water Summit 2019 as part of the so-called BWS Bulletin.

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