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Preventing water crises
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Preventing water crises

Global Framework for Action for Sustainable Groundwater Governance

The purpose of the document entitled Groundwater Governance – A Global Framework for Action is to make the importance of sustainable groundwater governance clear to political decision-makers.

The aim of the project, conducted between 2011 and 2015, was to bring attention at the global level to the importance of groundwater, and to disseminate the importance of appropriate groundwater management and governance through the presentation of already implemented best practices.

The international organisations that participated in and conducted the project were the Global Environmental Facility (GEF), the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), the UNESCO-International Hydrology Programme (IHP), the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) and the World Bank.

In the first phase of the project, the available stocks of groundwater were mapped, the country and regional-level databases were integrated, and case studies were produced. After that, a team of specialists created a global action plan consisting of regulations, directives, recommendations and best practices, aimed at the transborder development of groundwater governance.

The document containing the directives presents the role of groundwater, the variety of groundwater governance and use around the world, covering social, economic and political aspects, too. The document reviews financial and efficiency considerations, the subsystems that are in mutual dependency relationships with groundwater, the supporting systems of institutions, and presents the importance and the practical aspects of planning and management processes associated with groundwater in detail.

The aim of the global action plan is the transborder development of groundwater governance Photo: Shutterstock

The global framework document can be downloaded in English from the website of the Global Groundwater Project.

Further information: groundwatergovernance.org

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